Advanced Methods for Increasing Website Traffic

Hand showing Advanced Methods for Increasing Website Traffic

So you’ve mastered SEO 101 and beginning content marketing strategies; you’re well on your way to increasing the amount of traffic your site is capable of driving, but unfortunately, as the digital economy progresses, that’s not enough.

As the market becomes more and more competitive, you need to start adopting new strategies that can bring more impact to your site’s ability to drive traffic. Here are 3 tips useful to those trying to take their traffic to the next level:

Embrace the Impact of the Influencer

When you utilize an influencer to promote your product, you’re basically piggy-backing on a brand that’s already been established to promote your own.

Shopify has an excellent blog post on this concept, that discusses that consumer actually value word-of-mouth product recommendations more than conventional advertising. The value of an influencer endorsement, however, relies on how relevant they are to your audience.

Optimize the Impact of Your Advertising

Speaking of which, the value of your advertisement rests on how well you know your audience. One way to glean an in-depth understanding of your audience is by creating and studying customer personas that lend a little information about your audience.

By knowing where to find your audience in the digital market, you can target your advertising budget to be the most effective it can be. For example, which demographics watch the most TV, and how? Will your paid social media advertisements be more effective on Facebook, with the largest audience, or Instagram, with the youngest?

Use Analytics to Fine-Turn Your Website

If you’re not using some form of analytics to learn about your site, you’re missing out on your ability to grow. Google Analytics is the largest aggregator of website data, and within hours of signing up you can find out where your site is bringing in traffic and where it’s failing.

To ignore the many free tools that Google curates for website managers is to put blind faith in charge of your website’s success. The ability to monitor which keywords are bringing in traffic and which customers are being converted at the highest rates is invaluable in terms of your website’s growth.

Once you learn the basics of SEO and content marketing, your work is not done; you’ve simply grasped the foundations on which you can build a site that drives traffic and creates conversions.

How do you take your site’s traffic to new heights? Tell me in the comments:

Posted in SEO
Drew Berger

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Drew holds a degree in Political Science with a minor in Economics. He has experience writing in the areas of politics, economics, sports and sports business, and product descriptions. He always strives to produce unique content within a given deadline at a high level of quality.

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0 thoughts on “Advanced Methods for Increasing Website Traffic”

  • Avatar

    What if you don’t understand Google analytics? While it seems easy to write content and research using the free tools Google offers, when you sit down at the interface it feels more complicated. How does knowing which key words are getting traffic to your site going to bring additional traffic?

    • Avatar
      Grant Maddox says:

      I think knowing what keywords are driving website traffic allows you to target those same keywords more in future.

      • Avatar

        Quite true. But then I get myself all, “maybe I should try this too?” My content then becomes keyword rich for a number of long tail keyword phrases and once again, I lose my focus.

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        I guess it’s why I’m not a web master, and instead I am a content provider. While I have a ton of great ideas about what I would want a website to be about and I could handle the content writing, getting organized is a whole other problem.

        • Avatar

          I feel exactly the same way. I have ideas and I know what I’d like to build a website around at some point in the future, but I get so overwhelmed. Google Analytics seems helpful, but perhaps a little complicated for those of us who have never built a website before.

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            I guess that’s why us writers and content providers need website builders and they need us. If we were excellent at doing it all, well, we wouldn’t need to write for anyone else but ourselves.

          • Avatar

            Excellent point! While I’d love to be able to do everything myself, partnerships and being able to do work for others is essential.

          • Avatar

            Well, and what I mean is, it keeps us all employed. At least those of us that work as content writers. In the beginning, I could never understand why someone would pay me money to write a 500 word article, and now I get it. Sometimes it’s just not worth their time, and sometimes they truly can’t do it on their own.

          • Avatar
            Georgia Potts says:

            I think most of them can’t, really. After you’ve been doing it for a number of years, it seems simple and like anyone could do it. But for most people, they really just don’t have the skills for it.

          • Avatar

            I’m not sure if I meant to say it’s simple for everyone, but it’s my skill and I am grateful for it. Ask me to do your taxes, balance your checkbook, or fix your car? Not so much. We all have our skills, and it’s great when we can match our skills to the job we have.

          • Avatar
            Georgia Potts says:

            I really would, too. I’d rather do the writing and let someone else worry about the rest of it.

          • Avatar
            Rachel Elle says:

            I think a basic understanding of metrics and KPIs in any area can help. My day job is extremely data-driven and it’s made interpreting web stats a little better.

          • Avatar

            My organizational skills are lacking. I’m sitting still (shocker) writing my daily quota of content, and then I see “you have a reply”, and then I get sidetracked, head over hear and can’t wait to see what others have to say.

        • Avatar

          I agree ! Although I am fairly interested in web development, I find it’s best to stick to content creation until I have fully perfected my craft. Then, perhaps I can consider branching out.

      • Avatar
        Georgia Potts says:

        It has a ton of info, but not all of it is really pertinent. I’ve found that looking at a few key pieces of data can help guide you with a site. If you get bogged down in the pages and pages of data they give you, you will be distracted from the real work that you need to do on your site.

    • Avatar
      Doe Richard says:

      Once you know which words are attracting the most traffic to your site, you can make several strategic decisions based on the direction you need your content marketing campaign to go. For example, you may decide to use the popular keywords more in your content. You may also decide to tone down words or phrases that don’t seem relevant to your campaign objectives.

    • Avatar
      Natalya Ward says:

      I think Google Analytics or any other analytics tools often overwhelms people to begin with. As far as knowing keywords, it shows you what topics are bringing the most people to your site. This could be an indicator of what your audience wants most from your site. While I’m not overly keyword-centric, I do the insight in to what my audience is looking for.

      • Avatar

        What kind of site do you run? I have a parenting website that I started about six years ago and basically abandoned. I find it odd that I still get traffic there, as I haven’t updated in years and it is a free blogspot website. I tried using the analytics, but I still can’t figure out where my traffic is coming from.

        • Avatar
          Natalya Ward says:

          I have a hobby poetry site through WordPress and analytics helped me figure out where my audience was online. Over time, they’ve moved from Facebook to Pinterest and Twitter. I also discovered through page views which types of poems were most popular – surprisingly, sarcastic haikus have been my biggest hit.

    • Avatar
      Rachel Elle says:

      When you know what keywords your audience favors when searching for you, it really provides great insight into your SEO practices and what you can do to boost visibility.

      • Avatar

        Yes, I agree. I’m more of a writer than a marketer, and I’m learning new things every step of the way. It’s a great niche to be in…the writer/marketer, and useful to many businesses, so I continue to learn as much as I can.

    • Avatar

      I found Google analytics daunting when I first started out. I figured out how to set it up, though, thanks to a tutorial. Then, I just started poking around. Learn on the fly!

  • Avatar
    Quinn Evans says:

    I’ve always found word of mouth to be best initially. Then, as you grow, using analytics helps. You can also hone in on your audience that way.

    • Avatar
      Christine Birch says:

      Yes, that’s true for brick-and-mortar and online businesses alike. I’m much more likely to buy something recommended by a friend than a product I simply saw an ad for.

        • Avatar
          Christine Birch says:

          I think it depends if the recommendation is sought after. I know lots of people who go to social media asking for recommendations, but if an ecommerce business is recommended without prompting, it’s usually just not pertinent at the time.

    • Avatar

      This couldn’t be more relevant, Christine. With online companies busting the internet’s seams, it’s hard to know who to trust !

  • Avatar

    I agree that it takes some time to fully grasp Google analytics. In fact, I feel as if I’m still struggling with it, but I think it’ll come more easily as I invest more time in it. It’s like learning a new language in a lot of ways.

  • Avatar
    auntieemily says:

    I love the advice to research the audience that you would like to appeal to and to know where and how you should advertise in that regard.

      • Avatar

        The style is fine, but using analytics is nothing new or advanced. Neither is studying your website demographic. Studying analytics will not increase your traffic.

        • Avatar
          Doe Richard says:

          That web traffic analysis is not a revolutionary concept today is hard to argue against, but I tend to think it might inform certain decisions geared toward soaring web visits.

        • Avatar
          Rachel Elle says:

          Yes, not directly, but overall, I disagree. Analytics can be super valuable in helping you highlight what’s working and what’s not. I work as a financial analyst and we work with KPIs and analytics related to our industry a lot, and one number that’s a little different than it should be can skew an entire operation. By taking a deep dive into what the numbers have to say, we’re better able to make business decisions and recommend planning changes to the executive team. Tools like Google Analytics operate similarly.

        • Avatar
          Georgia Potts says:

          Studying them won’t do a thing for you, it’s true. However, studying your analytics gives you directions to go in. If you look at a high bounce rate from your landing page, that does nothing for you. If you use that data to change up the landing page to get more people to stay on it, the analytics were helpful.

  • Avatar

    Google Analytics can help you by showing what keywords are not bringing many visitors as well. For example, maybe you were hoping to get visitors who search for “coconut shampoo.” If Google Analytics shows you that very few visitors came who used that keyword, then you may want to increase the instances of that keyword in your text, or feature the keyword in a heading or menu.

    • Avatar
      Doe Richard says:

      Or if the few visitors are buying the intended product anyway, you find out what keywords they are typing into Google’s search box. You may opt to use their preferred search phrases more frequently in your content.

      • Avatar

        I get that part. But then I start to think, what if I tried this key word instead? What about this? Etc., and I get myself off track pretty easily.

          • Avatar

            yeah, now that I support myself 100% on my writing, my profits slow way down when I can’t focus. I’m slowly learning how to reign in the creative beast and simply write for profit and not for fun. It’s not always easy, but getting it right = bills paid.

          • Avatar
            Doe Richard says:

            What an approach to content writing! Myself, I try to make it fun as well, because I can barely pay attention to anything that’s not interesting to do, however well-paying it might be.

          • Avatar

            I try to make it fun by writing a Facebook status, “guess what I’m writing about today?” How to repair your toilet, Five ways to increase your web traffic, product descriptions for office products, real estate trends in Michigan, etc. My friends think I’m a bit nuts, but I always ask, so exactly what DO you write every day. Now I’ve made a game of it.

          • Avatar

            My friends are intrigued by the fact that I write product descriptions. They are a little puzzled about why I do the toilet repair and junk removal articles.

          • Avatar

            Ha. Mine are too. Why would someone hire you to describe office furniture? I also write a ton of content on air conditioning repairs, toilet repair, how to fix your driveway, etc…..ask me if I have ever done any of these things? But I am a plethora of how-to information without actually having to do the work.

          • Avatar
            Rachel Elle says:

            I love telling people what I’m writing about. They’re also so shocked that I can come up with content off the top of my head on topics I know little about.

          • Avatar
            Doe Richard says:

            I didn’t think I could do product descriptions the first time an opportunity came up. I wondered where that type of writing fell, between fiction and non-fiction.

          • Avatar
            Rachel Elle says:

            I make it fun by focusing on monetary goals and my tracking spreadsheets. But then again, I’m a weirdo.

          • Avatar
            Doe Richard says:

            Though many people don’t realize it, writing can indeed be fun, provided that a writer cultivates the right (read write) attitude!

          • Avatar

            Absolutely. What I love about being a freelance writer is working in my pajamas, not having a boss, writing content at 2 am and being available for my children 24/7 because of my flexible schedule. I also control what I earn, based on the effort I put it. I mean, I’m not going to make millions, but the more I work, the more I make. You can’t usually say that about a 9-5 job.

          • Avatar

            Congratulations to you, melissann! That’s a big goal that you’ve accomplished. Many of us are striving towards a full-time writing career.

          • Avatar

            My career was born out of necessity. After 17 years married to a lawyer, they decided I was no longer good enough for them. While I had been writing part time to keep my sanity as a stay at home mother, I moved out within a week of being asked for a divorce. Our finances were a disaster (I had no idea) and they were able to get out of alimony. Since I needed to eat and house myself, well, you can do anything you set your mind to when you need to.

          • Avatar

            I am. Totally rocking it. I finally found a way to use my BA in English and NOT have a boss. Yay me. It’s the perfect career when you have a busy life, want to control your own schedule, and you can write content in your sleep. Just saying, others can run marathons, others can design a website, I can write content.

          • Avatar

            I think the money thing is why I can’t write from home full time. I love my day job and the security (and $$$$) it provides, but writing is a great way to earn extra cash and keep myself busy.

          • Avatar

            It’s totally possible to write from home when you have a strategy in place. I average anywhere between $30-$50 an hour and I have had a pretty steady stream of work for the past 18 months. It’s being able to diversify, write fast, and write about the topics people want to buy. Some writers make less than minimum wage, because they are writing for a small site that offers .01 a word. You can build up a successful writing career. I work when I want, have shared 1/2 custody of my children, and I am available to them at all times while still being able to work, not depend on child care and pay my bills.

          • Avatar
            Rachel Elle says:

            I completely get that. I’ve been interviewing for new positions after our recent relocation, and trying to balance writing with a hectic interview schedule is so distracting. I’ve barely been able to hit my goals the last few weeks!

      • Avatar
        Rachel Elle says:

        Yes, exactly. If you’re calling your product a mustard-hued chapeau and customers are googling “Yellow hat,” it might be time to adjust your approach to keyword usage.

  • Avatar
    Doe Richard says:

    Great point on the use of influencers to grow your reach! There are many reputable people and brands that have many followers and a significant web visibility, and arranging for some of them to put in a good word for your products can pay handsomely.

  • Avatar
    Anabelle BF says:

    Google Analytics now actually hides most keywords… You can do keyword research on it, but as far as seeing which keywords bring people in your specific website, it’s not that good anymore.

    • Avatar

      This is good information to know. When I tried it, I could never tell which keywords were actually bringing people to my site to begin with.

    • Avatar
      Doe Richard says:

      Yeah, a content marketing pro may know it all, but those who are new to this trade could use some professional advice.

      • Avatar

        Right, Richard. Using a professional content marketing service can free up a business owner to focus on the other very important aspects of his or her business.

        • Avatar
          Doe Richard says:

          There’s nothing as rewarding as being able to focus on what I do best, letting experts help with areas I know little about.

  • Avatar
    Natalya Ward says:

    I think sometimes word-of-mouth is often overlooked in driving traffic. Sometimes all the paid marketing in the world isn’t nearly as effective as a few highly shared and talked about pieces of content or products on your site. While people might ignore ads, they’ll pay attention to what their friends and family recommend. Great tips, btw. These are things that often get lost in the shuffle when trying to bring in traffic.

    • Avatar

      Akin to word-of-mouth, another way to bring in traffic is to offer to do a guest blog post for free on a more prominent site. Write great content that will make the readers want to click on the link to your site. Engage actively with the blog commenters to improve the SEO ranking of your post.

      • Avatar

        Good advice. I’m still trying to hone in on what type of site I want to truly put my efforts into. A personal blog would open up all kinds of issues with the EX, although it could be highly entertaining. I don’t feel like much of a pro-mom, although I parent 4 kids….and a photography blog, my other career, seems kind of boring.

      • Avatar
        Natalya Ward says:

        Great advice Linnea! It never hurts to partner with other sites through guest posting. I had one guest post bring more views to one of my sites than several dozen blog posts put together. Replying back to comments on the post did help immensely. I’ve noticed a few of the commenter are now regular readers on my site.

        • Avatar

          Wow, that’s a nice success story. Good for you, for marketing your content effectively and getting more site traffic.

    • Avatar

      I totally agree with you. Word-of-mouth seems to be a much better traffic driver. I mean, most people are striving to create that perfect content that goes viral, and why except to drive huge amounts of traffic to a website for free.

  • Avatar
    Jennifer Allison says:

    My favorite way to increase traffic is by utilizing the e-mailing list (you’ve hopefully been capturing the addresses of the traffic – or it’s all for naught). Providing free training or special content, and promoting via social media, etc. Partnering with JVs is an excellent way to increase your list and traffic.

  • Avatar
    Christine Birch says:

    “To ignore the many free tools that Google curates for website managers is to put blind faith in charge of your website’s success.” … and is just plain silly. Why wouldn’t you use free tools at your disposal?!

  • Avatar
    Kat Featherton says:

    I think it would be helpful if methods on using Google analytics were broken down for people to understand. No matter how good you are at creating content, if you don’t know how to use the tools provided, you are always going to be limited in your success.

  • Avatar
    Charlotte Weeks says:

    I have Google Analytics and I’ve had it for quite some time. But I don’t understand how to read my analytics and make changes to my site to improve it. Could you point me towards a good resource for analyzing Google Analytics? Thanks!

    • Avatar

      Ha. My problems exactly. I don’t really get how to read my analytics. I can see where the traffic comes from, but I start to get all bogged down when trying to figure out what keywords are causing the traffic. I think my issue is in how my blog is so scattered to begin with.

  • Avatar
    Georgia Potts says:

    Influencer marketing is so hot right now. Just about every client I have is using social media influencers to get the word out about what they do.

  • Avatar
    Charlie Parker says:

    What are some ways of searching for the best (not necessarily the top) influencers on a certain topic or brand? That’s thing I’ve tried in the past and never really perfected a method that isn’t horribly time consuming.

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