Hearing Crickets? Here’s How to Elicit More Blog and Social Media Comments

Your business steers many resources toward its blog and social media platform, but it’s not getting the feedback and interaction it banked on. Let’s assume you’ve got plenty of traffic—an essential for interaction—but your posts simply aren’t generating comments. Don’t dismay and don’t give up the ship. By continuing to attract followers and adhering to these cricket-busting tips, you can encourage more comments and interactions from your traffic base and banish those crickets for good.

Are You Being Human?

Using a company-branded voice, quite frankly, has an omniscient quality that could be deterring readers from commenting. Let your readers know you’re human and not merely some nameless company entity that handles the Twitter or Facebook account. Who are you? Readers will be better able to connect when they feel that their interaction is with a human being and not a generic business voice.

Ask Questions

Although you may think that your blogs and social media posts invite comments, you might need to take a more direct approach and ask questions or even, if it comes down to it, ask for comments. Let’s say you’re an energy company and you frequently publish helpful informative blogs for your readership like how they can save money on energy bills during the winter. Try a variation on the topic and come out and ask your readership to share what they do to save money on energy costs. In the meantime, you can link back to that old post on the topic while generating some lively discussion.

Try a Content Makeover

No one wants to think their content is boring, but we’ve all snored—or scrolled quickly—through unexciting blog entries (certainly not this one) and social media posts. By making over your content, you could elicit more responses from your readership. How do you do this? You could (get ready for a shameless plug) hire a professional writer to revamp your content for you. A fresh voice could add more color and excitement to your entries. You could create more interest by inserting anecdotes into the content and avoiding topics that are overtly dry.

social media comments

Be Opinionated

While there are a number of bloggers out there who will advise other bloggers to be controversial to elicit comments, that’s not always possible for businesses that don’t want to alienate anyone. Even so, if your blogs routinely lack opinion, they begin to sound like company speak—a homogenized chunk of text that has had all its metaphorical teeth removed by multiple company censors so that it reads more like a manual and less like a personable conversation starter. There’s nothing overtly wrong in stating an opinion about topics within the sphere of your company—provided you’re tactful.

Comment Back

When your blog or social media posts do receive comments, it’s important to comment back. Discussion is a give and take process, so you have to reward interaction with more interaction. Moreover, people actually appreciate when they’re comment has been read and generates a real response from the post’s author.

If you can incorporate these tips into your blogging and social media platform, you’re likely to stir up more conversation. Remember, too, that generating traffic is key, so ensure that you continually build your readership with timely posts filled with meaningful content.

 

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J.A. Young

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J. A. Young has been freelancing professionally for 8 years. She has directed multi-type libraries and is an adept researcher. Her repertoire of published work includes marketing materials , straight journalism, and academic writing. J. A. Young has an MA in English and is comfortable writing/researching for any topic.

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Christine Birch
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Christine Birch

You’re right – sounding human and genuine are so important. I’m wondering if anyone has ideas on striking the balance between a personal and professional tone? Sometimes I want to be too human… distractingly informal.

Rob Toccs
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Rob Toccs

I tend to use second person and contractions, but refrain from using questions and exclamation marks. I know other writers have different ways of striking the balance though. I’d be interested in hearing others’ approaches, as well.

Rachel Elle
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Rachel Elle

My approaches are similar. I strongly dislike first person, even in blog posts. Comes off too know-it-all for me.

akmoyer91
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akmoyer91

First person is certainly a bold move better left to the experts. Confidence does looks bleak when paired with a novice.

Rob Toccs
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Rob Toccs

Ughh….Even when the “experts” use it, I still often don’t like first person.

akmoyer91
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akmoyer91

Perhaps I’ve read far too many novels then because I enjoy first person quit often. The character can be quit enticing depending on the nature of the content.

akmoyer91
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akmoyer91

Questions can come off as “salesy,” so I can appreciate that perspective. The balance really depends on what type of platform you are working off of. I think a professional tone is appropriate in most cases, whereas blogs and social media should come across as “more human.”

akmoyer91
Guest
akmoyer91

Questions can come off as “salesy,” so I can appreciate that perspective. The balance really depends on what type of platform you are working off of. I think a professional tone is appropriate in most cases, whereas blogs and social media should come across as “more human.”

Rob Toccs
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Rob Toccs

True, web content, blog posts, and social media — and even each social platform — all have different vibes.

Grant Maddox
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Grant Maddox

I follow a similar approach. I do, however, find an occasional question serves to make the reader think a bit about their own personal experiences. It’s something that can be easily overdone though, so caution is in order with questions for sure.

Rachel Elle
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Rachel Elle

Being human really is important, especially in building a community.

akmoyer91
Guest
akmoyer91

It truly is. I am apart of a community that has grown in the past months from commonplace corporate to an honored home. Surprising how a touch of personalization can improve a community and strengthen its foundation.

Linnea S.
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Linnea S.

That’s a cool idea, to ask readers to add to your numbered list. Blog readers enjoy contributing their ideas in the comment section.

akmoyer91
Guest
akmoyer91

My most favorite contributions have been adding to a “numbered list.” Being applicable certainly makes me feel less transparent. I assume this is the same for many others as well.

melissann
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melissann

Being opinionated is one way to spark a great conversation. As our election in the US shows, so is being outrageous. Look at the conversations that have happened over the past few months, simply because of the Cheetoh.

Rob Toccs
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Rob Toccs

Nice nick name. I think you could say a similar thing for Bernie. Both had huge influences on platforms.

melissann
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melissann

Agreed. Bernie did have a huge influence.

Rob Toccs
Guest
Rob Toccs

Nice suggestion, asking readers to add to a numbered list. I think that’s an opportunity a lot of writers miss.

Tay H
Guest
Tay H

Really like the point of being human. Chances are if its easy to read and relatable people will give their feedback readily.

akmoyer91
Guest
akmoyer91

I agree. I have noticed my most favorite contributions have followed a post that was intimate with ALL readers. Being personable is KEY.

Rob Toccs
Guest
Rob Toccs

To be intimate with all readers, a post needs to be targeted toward a specifically defined audience — and marketed to the same audience. That’s when all the people who read it will relate to it.

akmoyer91
Guest
akmoyer91

In retrospect, Yes. Although, I was speaking more along the lines of representing a sociable presence thats “personable”. Which is fairly different than being relatable. All readers can appreciate when “human” has been implemented into a post. Something about it is just pleasantly appeasing.

akmoyer91
Guest
akmoyer91

In retrospect, Yes. Although, I was speaking more along the lines of a social presence that is personable–Which is fairly different than relatable. Maybe not ALL, but certainly MOST readers can appreciate a human touch to content. Something about is pleasantly appeasing to a wide range of audiences.

akmoyer91
Guest
akmoyer91

In regards to business, I think this covers how important it is to hire direct personnel to run social media interactions. Equip them with training and workshops to guide them towards creating lasting engagements that count.

Rob Toccs
Guest
Rob Toccs

Sure, in theory. But, how many interactions have you had on social media that were “lasting engagements that count[ed]?” I think companies that don’t have social media as a primary marketing platform just need a little presence and should invest elsewhere.

akmoyer91
Guest
akmoyer91

Considering I am a millennial, I have experienced loads of impressionable interactions through social media ! My entire generation defines why social media is essential for businesses when considering a successful social strategy . Perhaps this will change one day once us “youngins'” get our heads out of the phones. But for now, we shall continue to fill the pockets of elitists and continue to repeat “I am free.” 😉

Georgia Potts
Guest
Georgia Potts

Opinions definitely make blog posts. A lot of companies want their posts to be pretty dry and have a strong sales vibe, and I think that’s the wrong way to go with a company blog. Blogs shouldn’t be an extension of your standard Web content. They should put a human face on your business.

akmoyer91
Guest
akmoyer91

Exactly ! I think a professional tone is always appropriate for standard web content. Linking to blogs and other social media platforms should give the consumer a more personal experience with who you are as a brand.

Rob Toccs
Guest
Rob Toccs

…but the concern businesses have is that they’ll offend some people.

…which gave me the idea — what if a business had several authors who wrote posts and each expressed different — sometimes directly contradictory — opinions. Could that work?

akmoyer91
Guest
akmoyer91

Generally speaking, a business has to understand that sharing their opinion is perfectly safe–Just as long as they steer clear from politics, religion, and contentious topics.

Contradictions can create a fine line. You wouldn’t want readers questioning the credibility of your business due to uncertain viewpoints. Although, I like the idea of debate-type arrangements. It has potential if used properly.

auntieemily
Guest
auntieemily

This was very interesting to me right now. I like the part about asking questions in the blog post – a great way to encourage interaction.

akmoyer91
Guest
akmoyer91

It most definitely is. Lack of questions leave us, the reader, full and complete. Therefor, there is little to discuss.

Rob Toccs
Guest
Rob Toccs

You might say the only better way is compensation ;-).

akmoyer91
Guest
akmoyer91

Crowd content has that idea on lock ! 😉 Compensation does certainly create a huge influx of reader engagements though. Giveaways and promotional things alike work wonders.

Bethany A.
Guest
Bethany A.

Love all of these tips! Having a human voice is so important. You really need to make a connection, not just sound like an computer.

laurej
Guest
laurej

I really liked that this mentions it being okay to be (tactfully) opinionated. That, and replying to comments really resonated with me, because sometimes I forget to do that on my sites.

Earl Dotson
Guest
Earl Dotson

Tact is something many people seem to lack these days, and it’s sad to see. Nobody’s ever lent credibility to their opinion by being a blowhard.

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